Press Archive - COPE
COPE Press

If you are interested in featuring COPE in a story please contact Prakash Masand MD at 919-619-5101 or [email protected]

Lessons to Learn from Overdose

The news of Demi Lovato’s alleged heroin overdose came as a shock to her many fans and other celebrities around the world. It is well-known that she suffers from mental illness and substance abuse but had reportedly been in recovery – then she recently wrote a song about relapse in her substance abuse.

When a Family Member Survives a Suicide Attempt

Three times, I’ve received a phone call telling me that my family member has made a suicide attempt. Three times, I’ve felt the same gut-wrenching grief and confusion mixed with a hint of anger. And every time, there’s been a sliver of hope too, because three times, he has survived.

Opinion: We can learn from Lovato’s alleged heroin overdose

Although I have not treated Demi Lovato, her struggles with bipolar disorder were public knowledge. Generally speaking, comorbid substance abuse is common with bipolar disorder, with patients turning to alcohol, cocaine and heroin. This can lead to non-response, non-compliance with treatment, relapse and difficulty achieving remission. Curing substance abuse isn’t possible until the bipolar disorder is properly treated.

How to Recognize the Lesser-Known Suicide Risk Factors and Warning Signs

The all-too-frequent deaths by suicide of high-profile celebrities like designer Kate Spade and chef-turned-television personality Anthony Bourdain, as well as members of local communities across the U.S., mean most Americans have been impacted in some way by suicide. This recent, tragic upswing has spurred increased discussions about suicide prevention and awareness.

Feeling Anxious?

The American Psychiatric Association (APA) found in a new study that Americans are more anxious today than they were a year ago, with 39 per cent of people reporting feeling more anxiety. The good news, however, is there are steps you can take to reduce that anxiety.The following 10 tips will help you alleviate your symptoms.

My View: Thai soccer team faces years of potential mental health challenges

The world awoke to the good news earlier this month: All 12 members of the Wild Boar soccer team and their coach were rescued after more than two weeks trapped inside a cave in Thailand. For some of them, the joy and celebration might be short-lived as they are now at an increased risk to experience post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental health issues.

We can all learn from Demi Lovato’s alleged heroin overdose

The news of Demi Lovato’s alleged heroin overdose came as a shock to her many fans and other celebrities around the world. It is well-known that she suffers from mental illness and substance abuse, but she had reportedly been in recovery but recently wrote a song about relapse in her substance abuse.

We can all learn from Demi Lovato’s alleged heroin overdose | Opinion

It is well-known that she suffers from mental illness and substance abuse, but she had reportedly been in recovery but recently wrote a song about relapse in her substance abuse. Although I have not treated Demi Lovato, her struggles with bipolar disorder were public knowledge. Generally speaking, comorbid substance abuse is common with bipolar disorder, with patients turning to alcohol, cocaine and heroin.

New Threat Arises for Cave Survivors

Yet while the physical bodies of these youths ages 11 to 16 were returned to the light after spending 18 harrowing and uncertain days inside the labyrinth, some may face a new possible threat to their lifelong mental well-being--post-traumatic stress disorder, according to widely respected psychiatrist Dr. Prakash Masand. He is the founder and CEO of Global Medical Education and co-founder and chairman of Centers of Psychiatric Excellence.

How Trying to ‘Have It All’ Impacts Your Mental Health

“When someone is trying to ‘have it all’ — which could mean the biggest house on the block, the corner office, the nicest car in the neighborhood and so on — it can impact their mental health because they are playing this perpetual game of chasing things,” Dr. Prakash Masand, a psychiatrist and founder of the Centers of Psychiatric Excellence, tells SheKnows.

Thai soccer team may face PTSD after rescue

The world awoke to the good news this week: All 12 members of the Wild Boar soccer team and their coach were rescued after more than two weeks trapped inside a cave in Thailand. All are at a hospital being treated and eventually will be reunited with their families. For some of them, the joy and celebration might be short lived, as they are now at an increased risk to experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental health issues.

40 Things to Stop Believing About Yourself After 40

It’s very common to worry about what people will think of your appearance, including your clothing, accessories, and makeup but while those things can help make a good first impression, it’s important to remember they don’t define who you are, says Prakash Masand, MD, psychiatrist and founder of the Centers of Psychiatric Excellence.

It’s Possible to Feel Less Overwhelmed — Here’s How

"Feeling overwhelmed causes stress, which is not only bad for your mental health, it’s also not good for your physical well-being and can lead to difficulty sleeping, digestion problems, increased heart rate, feelings of anxiety and other health concerns,” Dr. Prakash Masand, a psychiatrist and the founder of the Centers of Psychiatric Excellence, tells SheKnows. “The good news [is] there are plenty of ways to take control and feel less overwhelmed.”

How Carson Daly helped Meghan Trainor understand her anxiety

During her stint co-hosting “Today,” singer Meghan Trainor, 24, revealed how Carson Daly’s candor about his generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) helped her articulate her own struggle with anxiety. It turns out that pain may have been linked to her anxiety. In addition to “excessive, unrealistic worry and tension,” people with generalized anxiety disorder can experience muscle tension, headaches, fatigue and heart palpitations, Prakash Masand, M.D., a psychiatrist and founder of the Centers of Psychiatric Excellence, tells LIVESTRONG.COM.

June 27 is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Day

June 27 is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Day. Although it can be a difficult condition to work through and explain to others, there are things you can do to better cope and get on the path to recovery. What do you need to know? Here are 10 tips according to Dr. Prakash Masand M.D., a psychiatrist and founder of the Centers of Psychiatric Excellence:

Preventing suicide

The deaths of fashion designer Kate Spade and celebrity chef and TV host Anthony Bourdain have shocked the world. Suicide is an all too common problem in our modern society, and even affects those who seem to have it all together. Suicide does not discriminate among anyone, especially those with wealth, power, success, loving families and a seemingly perfect life.

June 27 is PTSD Awareness Day. Here are 10 Tips to Help You Cope.

June 27 is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Day. PTSD is a disorder that can develop as a result of a number of traumatic events: warfare, sexual assaults, car accidents, or other life-threatening events. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, current treatment approaches for PTSD consist of psychotherapy, medication, or a combination of the two. However, some military veterans experiencing PTSD have found relief from symptoms through reiki therapy, as detailed in “Reiki and PTSD” in the November/December 2014 issue of Massage & Bodywork magazine. Read the article here.

9 Habits That Make Anxiety Worse You May Not Realize You’re Doing

Whenever possible, it's always a good idea to avoid certain habits that make anxiety worse, and replace them with ones that make the day easier, smoother, and less stressful. This is good advice for anyone who could stand to have less stress in their life, but can be especially helpful for those who struggle with chronic anxiety.

What is the Nordic diet — and why do doctors, dietitians and even psychiatrists like it so much?

It’s difficult if not impossible to define an “American” diet. The U.S is so diverse, so multicultural and so successful at importing foods from elsewhere; and yet one thing remains sadly true on a general level: we’re not terribly healthy. As a nation we consume too much of the bad stuff (added sugars, saturated fats and sodium) and not enough of the good stuff (vegetables, fruits, dairy and healthy oils). Obesity rates continue to rise, not only among adults, but also among our children.

The Tragedy of Suicide: Part 2

PORT ORCHARD — The recent deaths of renowned chef and television storyteller Anthony Bourdain and women’s fashion accessories designer and businesswoman Kate Spade have given rise once again in American culture to the specter of suicide.

We need to do a better job of preventing suicide | Opinion

Anthony Bourdain’s suicide has stunned the culinary and entertainment world. Some celebrities, prompted by Bourdain’s suicide, shared stories of their own battles with depression. Patton Oswalt tweeted, "I’ve brushed up against this darkness and I know it’s a tempting exit but REACH OUT to ANYONE. He tweeted, "Stay on this side of it — in the light and warmth. Where you get to try again, every day."

Julie & Tamara Dr Masand Lite FM Part 1

Julie Guy & Tamara G. Weekday Mornings 5 a.m.-10 a.m. ET Julie Guy and Tamara G. have grown up with you and your families on the South Florida airwaves. Julie has been starting your day for years, teaming with Tamara G. (from 2006-2011) as "Those Two Girls in the Morning." In 2018, they have reunited for mornings on 101.5 LITE FM! Tamara is also a familiar friend to South Florida listeners from stints at other local stations, in addition to working in Dallas and most recently on a nationally-syndicated radio show. Julie is married with two kids who make her crazy. She runs as much as she can to get away from them... While Tamara G. is still looking for Mr. Right, or Mr. Right Now and she too is running from commitment. Tune in every morning to hang out with your two favorite girlfriends – on 101.5 LITE FM!

Dealing with Anxiety: 10 Expert Tips to Cope

Dr Prakash Masand M.D., the founder of The Centers of Psychiatric Excellence in America offers up 10 great tips to help us on the right path to coping with some of our anxiety and help to set you up for the best possible outcome.

Time to cure mental illness stigma for good

May is Mental Health Month, and the theme designated by the National Alliance on Mental Illness this year is “cure stigma.” We have certainly come a long way and are more accepting about mental illness, but we still have a lot of work to do.

Expert advice for understanding and treating your anxiety disorder

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), 40 million Americans, or 18% of the population, suffer from anxiety. The good news, however, is that anxiety disorders are very treatable conditions with the right interventions. Here is some expert advice that everyone experiencing an anxiety disorder should follow.

MIKE MASTERSON: Often undiagnosed

It's hard to believe almost a fifth of adult Americans experience some form of mental illness in any given year. That's just the reported cases, according to the CEO for Centers of Psychiatric Excellence, Dr. Prakash Masand. That amounts to about 44 million of us who come face to face with what I call "The Beast."

It’s time to cure the stigma for good

May is Mental Health Month and the theme designated by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) this year is “Cure Stigma.” We have certainly come a long way and are more accepting about mental illness, but we still have a lot of work to do.

Op-ed: Curing the Mental Health Stigma

The National Institute of Mental Health estimates that “approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. — 43.8 million, or 18.5 percent — experiences mental illness in a given year.”   May is Mental Health Month, and the theme designated by the National Alliance on Mental Illness this year is “Cure Stigma.” We have certainly come a long way and are more accepting about mental illness, but we still have a lot of work to do.

Let’s Cure Mental Health Stigma

May is Mental Health Month and the theme designated by the National Alliance on Mental Illness is “Cure Stigma.” We have certainly come a long way and are more accepting about mental illness, but we still have a lot of work to do.